Wine

Glory Be to the Blind Taster

I think this was taken around wine #20...

I think this was taken around wine #20…

The other night, one of my accounts spontaneously invited me to a blind tasting party at her house. It was a flattering gesture. I guess once people start inviting you to parties you really are part of the “industry.” Honor aside, I always jump at the chance to blind taste some wine. There’s a certain thrill in being able to determine more or less what’s in your glass based on nothing more than the sight, smell and taste of what’s been poured, especially if there are other people in the room and you’re determining it better than them.

Of course, like any test of wits, you can hedge the bets in your favor if your clever. Continue reading

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Chardonnay, Reviews, Varietal, Wine Reviews

Wine Review: Quimay Chardonnay 2012

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Get down with the Southern Hemisphere.

Naturally, right after writing an article about how oak is not to blame for the butteriness of Chardonnay, I end up running a tasting with a buttery Chardonnay that is not oaky. Full disclosure: the wine is only available at BevMo, and I happen to work for BevMo (part time, retail wine specialist). Implied conflict of interests aside, I promise to be fair in my assessment of the wine.

The Quimay Chardonnay is full of both varietal rhyme and locational Q’s, hailing from the exotic-sounding and deceptively-easy-to-pronounce Argentine region of Neuquen (Wikipedia has directed me to pronounce it as “new ken”). This is the first wine I’ve had from the region, which is evidently arid yet cool–or at least cooler than its confederate Argentine regions–giving the wines produced there characteristics unique from your typical Mendoza wine.

And the Quimay Chardonnay is certainly unique. Right off the bat, you get a lot of earthiness and minerality off the nose, with wet hay and limestone coming up strong, along with a good dose of green apple, nectarine, and a decided yeastiness, which–according to the tasting notes–comes from the natural yeast fermentation used in the production of the wine. ┬áTake a sip, and right away you notice how heavy and creamy the texture of the wine is, though in spite of that creaminess the wine still retains a medium-high acidity and is quite dry, with crisp green apple and grapefruit peel coming in hard and fast, along with a hint of lemon custard and pineapple. The finish is fairly long and mouth coating, echoing with hints of toasty meyer lemons. Visually, the wine sits rich yellow in the glass with a slight green tinge to it.

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